If you’ve ever wished you could use the processing time or downtime of an appointment to squeeze in another customer, you’re in luck: Genbook’s Split Appointments feature lets you do exactly that. You can now create services that have built-in downtime or breaks, during which you allow another appointment to be scheduled.

The easiest way to set up Split Appointments is from the Service Details page of the service you want to split. Choose the Split Appointment option under the “Appointment Type” heading, then enter the amount of time you need to spend with the customer at the start of the appointment, the amount of time you’ll have available while the customer’s color is processing (or their facial mask is setting, etc.), and the time you’ll spend with that customer at the end of the appointment. Don’t forget to save your changes.

In the example below, our stylist spends 25 minutes applying the customer’s color, then the color processes for 30 minutes (during which time the staff member is available for another appointment), and finally the stylist returns to the customer to wash out the color and so on for 20 minutes.

split appointments genbook

Here’s what an appointment booked for the Full Color service we just set up would look like in the Calendar.

split appointments genbook

To book an appointment during the downtime of a Split Appointment, simply click anywhere in that open space, select a service that will fit, and adjust the appointment start time as needed. Enter the customer’s details as usual, and save your changes.

split appointments genbook

Here’s what those two appointments would look like in our Calendar:

split appointments genbook

 

You can also create split appointments on an ad hoc basis directly in the calendar, even if the service you’re booking isn’t set up that way on its Details page. First, you’ll need to click the “Split Appointment” link on the “Add New Appointment” form.

split appointments genbook

Next, you’ll enter the amount of time you need at the start of the appointment, the amount of time you’ll have free, and the time needed to finish the service for the client.

split appointments genbook

In the above example, our staff member spends 30 minutes with the Anti-Aging Facial customer at the beginning of the appointment and applies a mask which sits on the customer for 20 minutes (during which the staff member is free to take another booking). The service provider then returns to the customer for 25 minutes.

The 20-minute time slot that’s free in the middle of the above split appointment can then be booked by a customer wanting to schedule a service with a 20-minute duration.

split appointments genbook

If you have a Split Appointment in your Calendar, but don’t want to use the “free” time to take another booking, you can place a “Block” in the space. If you’re not seeing the “Block” option, you can simply click in the space, adjust the start time and length (if needed), then save changes with no service selected or customer details entered. Since a Block is just a blank/empty appointment, the above steps will create a “Block” in your calendar.

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